Thomas Zvi Wilson Reading Series at the Johnson County Oak Park Library

  • Johnson County Library 9500 Bluejacket St. Overland Park, Kansas 66214 USA

The Thomas Zvi Wilson Reading Series at the Johnson County Library (Oak Park Location) will feature Arlin Buyert and Elizabeth Schultz. Joan Stone will accompany in dance Schultz's poetry.
 

(From left to right) Arlin Buyert, Elizabeth Schultz, Joan Stone

(From left to right) Arlin Buyert, Elizabeth Schultz, Joan Stone

 

Arlin Buyert was born and raised on his parent’s Iowa farm. He was formally educated at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. Arlin was a Navy pilot during the VietNam era and then worked many years in corporate America before he became a cattle farmer. He is now retired, does lots of volunteer work including teaching poetry at Lansing Prison, and lives with his wife Kris Kvam in Leawood. Arlin has published three books of poetry and edited two anthologies of inmate poetry that were published by Arts in Prison, Inc. He has poems published in various journals, on-line forums, religious magazines and even newspapers.

Elizabeth Schultz lives in Lawrence, Kansas, following retirement from the English Department of the University of Kansas, where she was Chancellor’s Club Teaching Professor. She remains committed to writing about the people and the places she loves in academic essays, nature essays, and poems. These include Herman Melville, her mother, and her friends, Kansas wetlands and prairies, Michigan's Higgins Lake, Japan, where she lived for six years, and oceans everywhere. She has published two scholarly books, five books of poetry, a memoir (three last year), a collection of short stories, and a collection of essays. Her scholarly and creative work appears in numerous journals and reviews. She is a dedicated advocate for the arts and the environment.

Joan Stone taught dance history and choreography at the University of Kansas from 1982 to 2010. A graduate of Sarah Lawrence and Yale, she has used her background in dance, anthropology, urban studies, and literature to build a career as a dancer and scholar. She has created an unusual repertory of narrative, historic, and environmental dances for solo dancer and group, which have been performed in the United States, Europe, Tajikistan, India, and China. Stone’s publications include writings on dance for American Studies, the American Journal of Archaeology, and a volume of Langston Hughes criticism; and completion of the late Harris Stone’s last book, Dispersed City of the Plains. She continues to create dance portraits of historic figures like Populist organizer Annie Diggs and works about protecting the environment, such as Bends of the Kaw: Stoppages and Survival and Remembering the Woods That Once Danced Behind My House. Her writings explore how we experience history, nature, and art through dance.